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The answer: 47 percent of respondents said that either they would cover the expense by borrowing or selling something, or they would not be able to come up with the $400 at all. I know what it is like to be down to my last $5—literally—while I wait for a paycheck to arrive, and I know what it is like to subsist for days on a diet of eggs. I know what it is like to have to swallow my pride and constantly dun people to pay me so that I can pay others.

In truth, it may be more embarrassing than sexual impotence.I know what it is like to have to tell my daughter that I didn’t know if I would be able to pay for her wedding; it all depended on whether something good happened. You wouldn’t even know it to look at my tax return.And I know what it is like to have to borrow money from my adult daughters because my wife and I ran out of heating oil. I am nowhere near rich, but I have typically made a solid middle- or even, at times, upper-middle-class income, which is about all a writer can expect, even a writer who also teaches and lectures and writes television scripts, as I do.To struggle financially is a source of shame, a daily humiliation—even a form of social suicide. So I never spoke about my financial travails, not even with my closest friends—that is, until I came to the realization that what was happening to me was also happening to millions of other Americans, and not just the poorest among us, who, by definition, struggle to make ends meet.It was, according to that Fed survey and other surveys, happening to middle-class professionals and even to those in the upper class. Chat for an hour tops (your convo disappears after that). You must be at least 18 years old to use Pure.- Your free 7-day trial begins when you subscribe.- Unlock all of Pure’s features with a weekly ($11.99), monthly ($29.99) or 6-month ($49.99) subscription.

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So if you really want to know why there is such deep economic discontent in America today, even when many indicators say the country is heading in the right direction, ask a member of that 47 percent. goes by other names: financial fragility, financial insecurity, financial distress.

But whatever you call it, the evidence strongly indicates that either a sizable minority or a slim majority of Americans are on thin ice financially. A 2014 Bankrate survey, echoing the Fed’s data, found that only 38 percent of Americans would cover a $1,000 emergency-room visit or $500 car repair with money they’d saved.

According to Johnson, economists have long theorized that people smooth their consumption over their lifetime, offsetting bad years with good ones—borrowing in the bad, saving in the good.

But recent research indicates that when people get some money—a bonus, a tax refund, a small inheritance—they are, in fact, more likely to spend it than to save it.

It was happening all across the country, including places where you might least expect to see such problems. What I hadn’t known, couldn’t have conceived, was that so many other Americans wouldn’t have the money available to them, either.