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He or she must also manually trim and clean up loose or connecting threads after the design is completed.

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Though some manufacturers still use manual embroidery to embellish garments, many prefer computerized embroidery's ease and reduced costs.At the Show of the Americas in 1980, Melco unveiled the Digitrac, a digitizing system for embroidery machines.The digitized design was composed at six times the size of the embroidered final product.In 1980, Wilcom introduced the first computer graphics embroidery design system to run on a minicomputer.Melco, an international distribution network formed by Randal Melton and Bill Childs, created the first embroidery sample head for use with large Schiffli looms.The embroiderer develops the embroidery manually, using the machine's settings for running stitch and fancier built-in stitches.

In this way, the stitches form an image on a piece of fabric.

The Digitrac consisted of a small computer, similar in size to a Black Berry, mounted on an X and Y axis on a large white board. The original single-needle sample head sold for $10,000 and included a 1" paper-tape reader and 2 fonts.

The digitizer marked common points in the design to create elaborate fill and satin stitch combinations.

Most modern embroidery machines are computer controlled and specifically engineered for embroidery.

Industrial and commercial embroidery machines and combination sewing-embroidery machines have a hooping or framing system that holds the framed area of fabric taut under the sewing needle and moves it automatically to create a design from a pre-programmed digital embroidery pattern.

These looms spanned several feet across and produced lace patches and large embroidery patterns.